Key to Your Imagination

April 2nd, 2018
Mike Gecawich

Today, it’s hard to think that there was a point in time when computers didn’t exist. Or that people commuted on horseback rather than by car. We’ve definitely come to take advantage of many of the inventions that we use most often. And yet, none of these nowadays-commodities would exist if it weren’t for inventors with active imaginations. Inventors need...

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Keyboarding Cryptograms

March 19th, 2018
Mike Gecawich

I recently had the pleasure of observing a teacher who had a unique approach to engaging students in lessons: She pitched every assignment as if it were a mystery to solve. From science experiments to determining the meaning of new vocabulary words, students were tasked time and again with “solving a challenging mystery”. And the results were incredible! Students approached...

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Have you ever wondered why memorizing the lyrics to a catchy song is easy while memorizing academic definitions or facts can feel impossible? Plenty of scientists have studied just what it is about songs that make them so easy to learn. The combination of repetition, rhyme, rhythm, and patterns all work together to make song lyrics “sticky”. Your students might...

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How Far Can You Soar?

March 5th, 2018
Mike Gecawich

Studies show that students are more invested in learning when they have a clear idea of how they are improving and where they stand on the route to mastery. In fact, providing students with visual displays of their formative assessments has been associated with a 26% gain in achievement. When we think about typing, students know they want to improve...

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Trivial Pursuit Keyboarding

February 26th, 2018
Mike Gecawich

What is the only manmade object observable from the moon? On which island was Napoleon exiled after his defeat at Waterloo? What is the capital of Australia? These are just three of the thousands of questions that make up part of the popular board game Trivial Pursuit. When Trivial Pursuit first came out in 1979, players relied on their own...

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How many times have you graded student writing with meticulous feedback only to have students shove the returned assignment into their binder without even glancing at it? Written feedback is a valuable teaching tool, but only if students read it and use it to improve. The first step in getting students to take feedback to heart? Teach proofreader’s marks! These...

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The Guessing Game

February 5th, 2018
Mike Gecawich

Kids are naturally curious. They want to know all there is to know about the world around them from how the seasons change to where kiwis come from. Let’s face it, though. In the typing classroom, it can be hard to activate students’ natural curiosity. So why not incorporate a typing game that does just that? The Guessing Game will...

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To this day I can still vividly remember my 7th grade U.S. History class with Ms. Dawson. Not only did she have an infectious enthusiasm for history, but she had an incredibly novel way of designing her unit tests: She let us write the questions! At the end of every unit, we would spend one class period writing multiple choice questions...

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Names are important. In his award-winning book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, Dale Carnegie gives readers a tip on just how important names are. "Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language." It’s true! Picture how you immediately perk up when your name is called, whether by a...

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As teachers, how can we foster creative thinking in our classrooms? One of the easiest ways is through creative writing. And coincidentally, there is a direct connection that can be made between creative writing and mastering typing. One of the main goals in learning to touch type is to get to the level where you can type as you think....

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